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UV Dechlorination

9 years 3 months ago #31328 by newworld
Replied by newworld on topic UV Dechlorination
i do/did 50% water changes weekly for years without dechlor, i keep mainly new worlds with a few old worlds....i've lost a few fish through the years after water changes I can't think of one new world I lost....

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9 years 3 months ago #31327 by BCParker
Replied by BCParker on topic UV Dechlorination
Just curious- What is your flow rate? How many tanks/gallons do you have and how much are you changing a day?

$6000 buys a lot of dechlor

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9 years 3 months ago #31326 by forumadmin
Replied by forumadmin on topic UV Dechlorination
So, yes you can do UV dechlorination. Given my flow rate, a system can be designed to do this.

Problem? It's $6000.

This project is not going to happen!

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9 years 3 months ago - 9 years 3 months ago #31303 by forumadmin
Replied by forumadmin on topic UV Dechlorination
With the help of a stopwatch, I did some testing to see how much water was getting changed in my tanks. I have many different tanks from 5G to 125G that get varying amounts of water.

I actually found my fry tanks were getting too much water. In an hour, my fry tanks were getting an effective 86% water change, taking into account the mix of old and new water. Since my total change time is about 3 hours, that is way too much.

Just FYI, the little black valves sold from Jehmco when fully open deliver almost 5 gallons per hour. I turned it down to about 1G per hour.

I'm going to do more testing to make sure that the appropriate amount of water is changed.

I also researched the average chlorine levels from my municipality. City water may be treated typically with 1-4 PPM chlorine, but my city averages (2010 results) about .8 PPM.

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Last edit: 9 years 3 months ago by forumadmin.

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9 years 3 months ago #31298 by forumadmin
Replied by forumadmin on topic UV Dechlorination
So, I heard back from one of the companies I have been researching on the web:

We do have units that can dechlorinate your water, the general rule of thumb is that it takes about 20 times the UV dose to drop the chlorine level 1 log as it does for disinfection. City water generally comes in at about 2 -4 ppm, so will a one log reduction, i.e. to 0.2-0.4 ppm, be sufficient? If we size the unit for the max flow, 20 gpm we would need a 400 gpm system, our closest model would be the D438 (a 500 gpm system). If we size for the typical flow, 8 gpm, we will require a 160 gpm system. Our D328 at 150 gpm may be a bit small, so I would go with the D338 at 225 gpm.

So, what is your chlorine residual? How low do you need to go? Do we design for your average or maximum flow? With regard to the last question, I would recommend designing for the maximum flow unless you have some way to equalize flow. If the flow exceed 8 gpm the chlorine residual will increase.


I've been doing a little research on chlorine toxicity levels in fish. Illinois Fish and Game (see www.isws.illinois.edu/pubdoc/RI/ISWSRI-85.pdf )says:

Ninety-six hour residual chlorine bioassays were conducted on bluegill and channel catfish. In 96-hr acute toxicity studies with ammonia (NH3 -N) bass, in addition to bluegill and channel catfish, were included. The studies were performed in waters typical of most lakes and streams in mid-western states, i.e., relatively high in alkalinity and the salts of calcium and magnesium. Observations of the characteristics and reaction of the fishes to each toxicant were noted. The 96-hr median tolerance limits for residual chlorine were: from 0.18 to 0.33 mg/1 for bluegill depending on temperature and fish weight; about 0.09 mg/1 for channel catfish with temperature not a factor. For ammonia the 96-hr median tolerance limits were: from 0.40 to 1.3 mg/1 for bluegill depending on temperature and fish weight; from 0.72 mg/1 at 22° C to 1.2 mg/1 at 30°C for bass and 1.5 mg/1 at 22°C to 3.0 mg/1 at 28° C for channel catfish with size not a factor. For the protection of the fishes investigated, and consistent with Illinois water pollution regulations, residual chlorine should not be detectable and NH3-N should not exceed a concentration of 0.04 mg/1.

Another source ( www.h2ou.com/h2wtrqual.htm#References ) recommended no more than .01 mg/L, which is equal to 0.010011423 PPM.

I don't have exact numbers for how much water I'm changing. The fry tanks get the most. . . probably about a 75% change over 2 hours.

Before I spend some serious dollars on an electronic dechlorinator, I'll do some exact measurements.

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9 years 3 months ago #31296 by mikeg2929
Replied by mikeg2929 on topic UV Dechlorination
I guess it depends on how much h20 you are changing at a time. When I had tanks, if i changed under 25%, I did not use dechlor. Once I kept bigger groups of messy fish (fronts, petros, tropheus) I started using dechlor.

Are your water changes continuous? If so, a simple drip of sodium thiosulfate (cheap) should work great. set to the same timer as your water change system via an automatic valve.

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9 years 3 months ago #31295 by Mugwump
Replied by Mugwump on topic UV Dechlorination
Sounds like you would need a 'stadium' sized bulb to be effective on any really large volume of water, in a reasonable time frame??? That's a lot of power draw. I'll have to read it again and do some more looking.
Nice find,tho..interesting....

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9 years 3 months ago #31290 by forumadmin
UV Dechlorination was created by forumadmin
I've been doing a little reading online to find a dechlorinating solution for my automatic water changing system. Of course, the methods most of us think of to declhorniate water are:
  1. Water Additives like Novaqua, etc.
  2. Carbon Filters or Chemical Filters
Interestingly, I found out that UV light can be used to dechlorinate. You have to use 10X the dosage that you would use to eliminate pathogens, but the benefit is that the chlorine does not break down into ammonia.

See:
ebookbrowse.com/uv-dechlorination-pdf-d23119061

Anyone ever looked into this?

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