Sign up for email reminders for Meetings, Swaps, Auctions, and Other Events.

Subscribe

Sign up for email reminders for Meetings, Swaps, Auctions, and Other Events.

Buffalohead herding behavior

7 years 6 months ago - 7 years 6 months ago #31945 by Nuchal Man
Your absolutely correct similis. Flicking the pelvic fins in parental substrate spawning fish is exactly how they communicate. Many times, this is why the pelvic fins usually change color in breeding fish. For example, many cichlids develop different colored pelvic fins when breeding. Usually they are pitch black pelvic fins or another color that provides high contrast to their body color and visible to the fry so they can see them (convict types, Herichthys, and Apistogramma are especially good examples of this). This is some of the research our lab works on. In some species, like the Astatheros alfari complex, they are bright yellow. Pretty much if an Astatheros alfari fry wanders off and winds up seeing black pelvic fins instead of moms yellow, he's not going to be along much longer. :lol:. Different flicks of the pelvic fins also mean different things. Most of the time, they are flicking and telling their fry to get down or get under them as there is a predator in the area.

I have a confession. I'm a cichlaholic.
Last edit: 7 years 6 months ago by Nuchal Man.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
7 years 6 months ago #31938 by similis
I know this is an old post, but I think it's pretty neat the way the parents "twitch" while hovering above the fry. It must be some sort of signal to the fry to be careful or maybe to just keep their attention?

Either way, it's a neat behavior.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 4 days ago #22465 by leej24
Replied by leej24 on topic Buffalohead herding behavior
While observing them today, it seemed to be the male's responsibility to catch the fry and put them back into the cave.  I didn't realize what he was doing until I saw him moving the fry from the front of the tank to the cave.  The female seemed to move in short bursts.  I think it was to tell the fry to move.  She was also keeping away the angelfish.

Got Green? What's your carbon footprint?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 4 days ago #22453 by rm-slover
this is something that is a cool part of the fish keeping hobby. Most of the substrate spawners I have kept are pretty good parents., The firemouth types, the G. Brasiliansis, the Convict types are really good parents.

<a href=" www.aca2010.com " target=_blank><img src=" www.aca2010.com/wp-content/images/simple_aca2010_banner.jpg " alt="ACA 2010 Web Site" height="60" width="468" /></a>

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 4 days ago #22452 by aquaticclarity
That is failry normal behavior for a lot of the cave spawning fish that I've had spawn for me.  Parental care usually lasts for 3-4 weeks, about the time it takes for the pair to be ready to spawn again.  But I have had occations were I've left juvinals in a tank and the parents have spaned again and taken care of BOTH broods at the same time.

The high level of parental care is one of the big enjoyments of keeping non-mouthbrooding cichlids.

Jeff

Too many fish?  Never.  Not enough tanks?  Always!

My fish list...

www.gcca.net/gccaforum/index.php/topic,274.0.html

www.aquaticclarity.com

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
10 years 4 days ago #22451 by leej24
I've noticed something I thought was neat and I don't know if this pertains to all cave breeding cichlids.  For the last three days ever since the S. casuarius fry were able to leave the cave where they were born, their mother would herd them out into the open to forage for food.  Both the male and female did a pretty good job of keeping the angelfish at bay (the angelfish really weren't interested in the fry anyways). 

Every night when I would come home--around 7 to 7:30 the fry would be gone.  I thought the parents ate them or maybe the angelfish got to them.  Then I would use my flashlight and look around the tank to make sure they weren't just hiding.  What I found was that the mother herded them back into the cave they were born in.  I could see the little buggers inside.  When they tried to leave, the mother would catch it and put it back in the cave.

Again, this morning the fry were out and about foraging for food with their parents.  They didn't seem to stray too far from the "flock" before the parents would go and get the stray.  I'll have to see whether this continues again tonight when I get home from school and for how long this will continue.

Any thoughts?

Got Green? What's your carbon footprint?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
Time to create page: 0.080 seconds