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Snake Head Fish

9 years 4 months ago #27633 by MbunaMan25
Replied by MbunaMan25 on topic Snake Head Fish

Agreed X 2.  If true, I would think this would have made the papers based both on (a) the existence and capture of a snakehead on the Rock, and (b) the irony and drama of the DNR re-releasing an invasive species. Jdub - do you have some further info on this?

Related to urban legend, there was some sort of show on TV (monsterquest, or hooked, or river monsters, etc.) that featured the red-belly piranha and the possibility of released specimans perpetuating within the lake of the ozarks.  After specimans were being caught and written off as unwanted releases from uninformed/uncaring hobbyists, there was testing of piranha's reaction to temps in the mid-50's and apparently there is an area of the ozarks where a natural hot spring feeds within that has a minimum temp of mid-50's in the winter.  Legend...?


Yeah that was on monsterquest. And there was a place by a spring in the lake that never got below 57*F degrees.

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9 years 4 months ago - 9 years 4 months ago #27628 by baldtaxguy
Replied by baldtaxguy on topic Snake Head Fish
You are right, it did occur....seven years ago...and less than a year after snakeheads were banned under federal and most state laws.  I guess the DNR deserves some slack since the federal regulation specifically highlights the resemblence to the bowfin species.  That said, pretty sad when the people we trust to care for our natural resources do not use the level of care to avoid such errors.  How did they determine that the snakehead is "unlikely" to survive WI waters? Link to a summary of the article:

www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3088056/

Here is a link to the federal register adding snakehead as federal injurious species:

www.fws.gov/policy/library/2002/02fr62193.html

Per Mike Staggs, director of fisheries at the Wisconsin DNR: "It’s unlikely the giant snakehead could survive the cold water of a Wisconsin winter."

Per Page 62196 of the 2002 federal register: "...members of three species complexes are temperate; and one species is temperate to boreal and can live beneath ice in the northern portion of its range."

Last edit: 9 years 4 months ago by .

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9 years 4 months ago - 9 years 4 months ago #27609 by jdubcichlids
Replied by jdubcichlids on topic Snake Head Fish
If you don't believe the story call the Janesville office for the DNR they will tell you the story.  Why would I write that post if it wasn't true?


Baldtaxguy it DID make the paper heres the article. Beloit Daily News



MADISON – The recent capture of a highly predatory exotic fish in the Rock River between Janesville and Beloit is a clear indication that Wisconsin needs more stringent regulations on the possession of live, potentially harmful exotic fish species, according to state fisheries officials.

Department of Natural Resources fisheries staff recently captured a 24-inch long giant snakehead (Channa micropeltes), also called the red snakehead, while conducting a fish survey of the river. The giant snakehead is a native of southeast Asia and a close relative of the northern snakehead (Channa argus), which gained notoriety last summer when an established population was found in a Maryland pond and subsequently eradicated by state fisheries crews to prevent its spread to neighboring waters. It was initially misidentified as a bowfin and returned to the river after the survey crew snapped a photo.

Fisheries biologists later identified the fish in the photo as a giant snakehead and a second survey of the river section where the fish was netted failed to find that fish or any other individuals.

DNR fisheries managers are developing a plan for more sampling of the Rock River between Janesville and Beloit to determine if any more snakeheads are present. Also, the river will be surveyed for any warm-water discharges that could help the species to survive over-winter.

While the giant snakehead is unlikely to survive water temperatures of a Wisconsin winter, “the size of this specimen suggests that is has been in the river for some time,” said Mike Staggs, director of the DNR Bureau of Fisheries Management and Habitat Protection. “There are warm-water power plant discharges along the Mississippi River system from here to the Gulf of Mexico where this species might actually be able to become established.”

The giant snakehead is a large aggressive freshwater fish that can grow up to 36 inches “and is not appropriate for the private aquarium trade and is best left to public aquariums,” Staggs said.

Because adult snakeheads need a large tank that can hold at least 150 gallons of water, they can quickly outgrow the average home aquarium, which could possibly result in owners getting rid of them by releasing the fish into the waters of Wisconsin.

“It is clear that Wisconsin needs to follow the lead of other Great Lakes states, including Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio, and ban the possession and trade of live snakehead fish,” Staggs said.

“We need to work with the governor’s office, the legislature, the Department of Agriculture, which regulates fish imports, and the aquaculture industry and affected industry to develop effective regulations controlling the possession of live snakeheads and other exotic species that could survive in Wisconsin waters,” Staggs said.

Other exotic species of concern include swamp eels, recently found in Florida and Georgia, bighead carp and silver carp, already established in Illinois and Iowa, black carp and grass carp.

Releasing aquarium fish to the wild is illegal in Wisconsin and can result in exotic species becoming established in Wisconsin waters, much to the detriment of native fish.

“The great danger of releasing tropical fish into natural waters is the threat of introducing new diseases and parasites into the wild that can harm native species,” Staggs said.

“What’s more,” he continued, “exotic species can have harmful ecological impacts on native species and communities. Once an exotic species is established, it is virtually impossible to eradicate, as Wisconsin has seen with sea lampreys, ruffe and gobies in the Great Lakes.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has listed all snakeheads as injurious species under the Lacey Act, meaning the federal government bans importing or transporting all snakehead species between the continental U.S., the District of Columbia, Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

The federal ban doesn’t make it illegal to own or possess a snakehead where they are currently allowed, but it does bar their transfer between states or importation into a state.
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9 years 6 months ago #27221 by dragonkeeper
Replied by dragonkeeper on topic Snake Head Fish
Agreed X3. Story just has way to many holes in it. Do you have the link to this article?

DragonKeeper
~Retired President~

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9 years 6 months ago #27220 by baldtaxguy
Replied by baldtaxguy on topic Snake Head Fish
Agreed X 2.  If true, I would think this would have made the papers based both on (a) the existence and capture of a snakehead on the Rock, and (b) the irony and drama of the DNR re-releasing an invasive species. Jdub - do you have some further info on this?

Related to urban legend, there was some sort of show on TV (monsterquest, or hooked, or river monsters, etc.) that featured the red-belly piranha and the possibility of released specimans perpetuating within the lake of the ozarks.  After specimans were being caught and written off as unwanted releases from uninformed/uncaring hobbyists, there was testing of piranha's reaction to temps in the mid-50's and apparently there is an area of the ozarks where a natural hot spring feeds within that has a minimum temp of mid-50's in the winter.  Legend...?

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9 years 6 months ago #27219 by sawboy2
Replied by sawboy2 on topic Snake Head Fish
Agreed. DNR would know a snakehead from 50 yards there has been so much talk about them. I'm thinking urban legend.

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9 years 6 months ago #27218 by dgarnier
Replied by dgarnier on topic Snake Head Fish
I find that a bit hard to belive - The DNR wouldnt turn loos a fish they didnt recognize.  Second with all the hype about snakeheads I dont think you could find a DNR person that dosent know what a snakehead looks like.

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9 years 6 months ago #27217 by jdubcichlids
Replied by jdubcichlids on topic Snake Head Fish
The DNR was shocking in the Rock River by the Townline Bridge/power plant area when they shocked a fish they didn't recognize. They threw the fish back(idiots) after a little tiem talking about the fish they realized they had shocked a Snakehead. They went back to the area immediately to try and re capture the fish but to no avail. This was an early spring shock so they can survive the winters. I am guessing it was drawn to that area because there is a large discharge tube that has hot water flowing from it.

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9 years 9 months ago #26478 by Hurriken
Replied by Hurriken on topic Snake Head Fish
At the Goldfish Market in Hong Kong I saw them for sale. They had babies hanging from the wall in bags.

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9 years 9 months ago #26407 by WhiteDevil
Replied by WhiteDevil on topic Snake Head Fish

They say its a good eating fish, but has anyone actually caught on in IL? I believe they said they can be found around here.


a few years back I think a CTA member caught a northern snakehead at burnham harbor/chinatown.
shouldnt say think, I know he did.

www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6254302/

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