viral hemorrhagic septicemia

11 years 5 months ago #10877 by nuth88
Replied by nuth88 on topic viral hemorrhagic septicemia
Sam~

Thank Blago~

He is personally responsable for budegt cut that are killing the ILDNR.

>:(

"I guess that's the way the whole durned human comedy keeps perpetuatin' itself."

(The Stranger - 6/1998)

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11 years 5 months ago #10875 by Nuchal Man
Agreed. Duane, that was some solid info.

Does anyone know how much the Govt. is looking into programs on research for this virus, or are they mostly turning a blind eye? Duane, our DNR is pretty bad here in Illinois, so up in Wisconsin I'm sure they are doing more.

I have a confession. I'm a cichlaholic.

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11 years 5 months ago #10872 by baldtaxguy
Replied by baldtaxguy on topic viral hemorrhagic septicemia

I attended a lecture on VHS recently and was talking to Mike Pauers (Dr. of Ichthyology) about it.
He said healthy fish were not the issue, and that the fish most often seen infected had already been captured and were held in "net stake" holding pens.
As far as entering the tap water. Most treatment plants, like the one I work at, have multiple barrirers to stop viruses from passing throough. We do regular viral testing here in Milwaukee, and find the 1st barrier, ozone, eliminates most, then coagulation, flocculation and filtration pull any stragglers out, and the last defense, chloramine, takes care of the rest. For once something good for the fishkeeper from our old enemy, CL2.
My only concern, is that bird droppings falling into a pond, could bring the virus in, when fish are brought in for the winter.


Duane - good post, thanks

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11 years 5 months ago #10856 by rm-slover
hey dude - throw some duckweed in there... that will suck up some of the nutrients....

<a href=" www.aca2010.com " target=_blank><img src=" www.aca2010.com/wp-content/images/simple_aca2010_banner.jpg " alt="ACA 2010 Web Site" height="60" width="468" /></a>

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11 years 5 months ago #10852 by
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Given we are talking about wisconsin, I would be more wooried about the neighbors taking and dip and the waste they leave behind than i would about bird droppings......

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11 years 5 months ago #10850 by duanest
Since the Gymnos will be kept out of the line of main tank banks, because of their cool water preference, and I'm not overly concerned, and as long as they're generally healthy.  Seems VHS only gets a foothold under stressful or unheathly conditions.
I haven't seen the Gymnos in a couple weekks now, had an algae bloom in the pond and can't see more than a few inches. Waiting for the hyacinths to take off and suck up any nutrients to clear it up.

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11 years 5 months ago #10849 by nuth88
Replied by nuth88 on topic viral hemorrhagic septicemia
"My only concern, is that bird droppings falling into a pond, could bring the virus in, when fish are brought in for the winter."

Duane~

Has this been a issue with this virus? Gymnos??

???

"I guess that's the way the whole durned human comedy keeps perpetuatin' itself."

(The Stranger - 6/1998)

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11 years 5 months ago #10848 by duanest
I attended a lecture on VHS recently and was talking to Mike Pauers (Dr. of Ichthyology) about it.
He said healthy fish were not the issue, and that the fish most often seen infected had already been captured and were held in "net stake" holding pens.
As far as entering the tap water. Most treatment plants, like the one I work at, have multiple barrirers to stop viruses from passing throough. We do regular viral testing here in Milwaukee, and find the 1st barrier, ozone, eliminates most, then coagulation, flocculation and filtration pull any stragglers out, and the last defense, chloramine, takes care of the rest. For once something good for the fishkeeper from our old enemy, CL2.
My only concern, is that bird droppings falling into a pond, could bring the virus in, when fish are brought in for the winter.

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11 years 5 months ago #10835 by nuth88
Replied by nuth88 on topic viral hemorrhagic septicemia
Thanks Sam, Please keep us updated, as I was wondering the same thing Radek asked as I reead the link Scott provided.....

Nuthman~

:o

"I guess that's the way the whole durned human comedy keeps perpetuatin' itself."

(The Stranger - 6/1998)

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11 years 5 months ago #10831 by Nuchal Man
Probably going to be a large part of the Shedd Aquarium Mentorship Program I'll be doing on the great lakes in a few weeks.

Radek, I wouldn't think it would effect the tap water with everything they put into it to make it safe for humans.

Should change anyones mind about going out for local fish as feeders to any one who keeps large predacious fish, especially if there are more instances outside the great lakes.

I don't know much about the virus other than it is like ebola for fish, but the pictures are brutal!

I have a confession. I'm a cichlaholic.

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