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A high-quality, fiber-rich food

Tropheus and mbuna are prone to bloating. Providing lots of fiber and vegetable matter in the diet is one of the best ways to maintain good health. Commercial, prepared foods are often lacking in fiber and vitamins.

This food is rich in fiber (shrimp shells, veggies), vitamins and includes garlic to help guard against intestinal parasites.

Before you get started…

  • Purchase needed items and lay out everything required.
  • Never switch fish to a new diet quickly. Introduce a small amount of the food at a time and watch your fish over a period of days to gauge acceptance and consequences.
  • This is not a project for kids. As always, use care when using a knife or a food processor.
Step Pictures

Tools/Equipment

a. Food Processor

b. Paring knife and garlic press

c. 8 Zip-loc sandwich bags

Measuring cup(s)
Measuring spoons
Spatula and a large spoon

a. b. c.

Ingredients

a. 12 oz. package of med-large frozen raw shrimp with shell, thawed

b. Liquid Aquarium Vitamins (HW Multi-vit shown)

c. 8 oz. (1/2 pkg) frozen peas

d. 3 broccolli stumps

e. 2 medium carrots, scrubbed

f. 6 leaves Romaine lettuce, washed and trimmed

g. 2 packets of Knox gelatin

h. 1 clove fresh garlic, peeled

a. b. c.
d./e./f.    g. h.

Step 1

Measure 1/4 cup of very cold water in a measuring cup.

Sprinkle the two packages over the surface.

Mix with a spoon to a slurry consistency.

Step 2

Add 3/4 cup of boiling water to the gelatin mixture.

Mix thoroughly and set aside.

Step 3

Place the frozen peas in a heat-proof bowl.

Add boiling water to cover.

Step 4

Make sure the shrimp are thawed out.

Rinse and add to the food processor.

Step 5

Process the shrimp to a paste-like consistency.

Some small pieces are OK.

Step 6

Drain the peas.

Step 7

Add the peas to the food bowl and process until smooth.

Step 8

Peel the rough outer layer from the broccolli stumps.

Step 9

Cut the carrots and broccolli stumps into 1/4 inch pieces.

Note— if you do not have a very powerful food processor, you may wish to process these first with a little water and set them aside.

Step 10

Tear the Romaine lettuce into small pieces.

Step 11

Add the broccolli, carrots and lettuce to the food processor bowl.

Process to small chunks. You may need to stop periodically and scrape down the sides.

Step 12

Add the gelatin mixture and process until smooth.

Step 13

Force the peeled garlic clove through the garlic press into the bowl.

Add 1 TBS (tablespoon) of the liquid vitamins.

Step 14

Process until thoroughly mixed.

Step 15

Spoon some of the food mixture into a ziploc bag until it is one-quarter full.

Step 16

Lay the filled bag on a flat surface and carefully squeeze out any air.

Seal the bag.

Keep flat.

Step 17

You should have 6–8 sandwich bags of food.

Lay them flat on a piece of cardboard or a cookie sheet.

Refrigerate for 3–4 hours.

Step 18

The food mix should have firmed up to a jelly-like consistency.

Transfer to the freezer.

Feed it!

Do not thaw the food.

Break off small piece of the frozen food and feed your fish.

Always take care when introducing new foods.

Some fish, especially those used to flake foods, take a while to take interest in this food.


 

Month Bowl Show Fish
January
  1. Pseudotropheus/Cynotilapia/Melanochromis
  2. Cichlasoma under 6" in length
February
  1. Labeotropheus
  2. Astronotus/Uaru/Crenicichla/Herotilapia/Cichla/Neetroplus
  3. "Breeder's Choice"(5 fry under 6 mos. of age)
March
  1. Aulonocara/Tramitichromis
  2. Aequidens (except Laetacara curviceps complex)
April
  1. P. scalare (veil angels)
  2. Hemichromis, Lamprologus (West African),Nanochromis, Pelvicachromis, Steatocranus
May
  1. Lamprologus (Tanganyikan)
  2. Apistogramma, Papiliochromis, Crenicara, Laetacara curviceps complex
June
  1. Julidochromis, Telmatochromis, Chalinochromis
  2. Geophagus, Gymnogeophagus, Satanoperca, Biotodoma, Acarichthys, Guianacara
July
  1. Chromodtilapia, Thysochromis, Teleogramma, Etroplus, etc.
  2. Tilapia, Sarotherodon, Oreochromis
  3. Discus
August
  1. Haplochromis, etc., Hemitilapia, Lethrinops, Chilotilapia?
  2. Breeders Choice
September
  • No bowl show, GCCA Picnic
October
  1. "Cichlasoma" — 6 inches and over
  2. Tanganyikan Mouthbrooders (Cypthotilapia, Tropheus, Calinochromis, Cyprichromis, Cyathopharynx, Opthalmotilapia, Eretmodus, Spathodus, Tanganicodus, Xenotilapia, Triglachromis, Limnochromis, etc.)
November
  1. Photos/Artwork
  2. Lake Victorian Haplochromis
  3. P. scalare (standard angels)
December
  • No bowl show— holiday party
Month Bowl Show Fish
January
  • Central & North American 
February
  • No bowl show - Rarefish Auction
March
  • Madagascar, Indian, West African & all other non rift lakes 
April
  •  Malawi - Aulonocara & Lethinrops Only
May
  • Malawi - Haplochromis & Mbuna (Everything except Aulonocara & Lethinrops) 

June
  • South American
July
  • Tanganyikan
August
  • No bowl show - Rarefish Auction
September
  • No bowl show, GCCA Picnic
October
  • Victorian & Middle East Cichlids
November
  • Winners bowl - Any Cichlid limit of one fish entry per membership 
December
  • No bowl show— holiday party

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