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Rumor has it that someone in our club has a group of these and is trying to BAP them

 


As I am a big fan of the Copadichromis species here is a cool video of Copadichromis sp kawnaga Mbamba bay

 


I have started to spawn more and more cichlids and thought, it would be nice to share my approach and techniques for raising fry. This article will focus on the techniques and approaches that I have adapted to use to raise and grow out my fry. These techniques are simple and have been pretty successful, resulting in relatively good results. I like to keep things simple and easy and often look for the simplest and easiest way to be successful.

Credit has to given to the members of the GCCA club, as a lot of my experience comes from techniques shared to me by other club members.  I take no credit for any of these ideas as being original or being applicable in all circumstances.

Saw this video on another site and thought it was phenomenal and had to share.

The website Seriously Fish reports that two new species of Victorian cichlids have been described. There is a huge amount of work yet to be done on the taxonomy of Victorian cichlids, so this is welcome news.

The two newly described fish are Haplochromis argens and Haplochromis goldschmitti

For the complete article with pictures:

http://www.seriouslyfish.com/2-new-cichlids-from-lake-victoria/

 

LED lights are all the rage these days, offering promises of dramatically lower energy consumption and long life.

Until recently, all aquarium LED lighting systems were external units intended to be placed on top of a tank. Marineland has recently introduced their new Hidden LED Lighting System which is fully enclosed and waterproof. It can be used inside an aquarium hood or actually submersed in the water.

I have a dual stack of custom-made 50 gallon tanks which are fully enclosed. To light these tanks, I use marine-style fluorescent end caps powered by an external ballast. Recently, one set of end-caps shorted out blowing out my expensive Ott bulb.

It was time to try something new and hence this review. At the ACA Convention, I heard of this new product, so I had it in mind. I paid about $48 US on sale for a 17" unit.

Marineland offers both a 17" and 21" version of the Hidden LED Lighting System which combines 6,500K white and 460nm blue LEDs for general aquarium illumination. The switch provided is 3-way (Off, Blue, and Blue+White LEDs) which equates to off, lunar and daytime lighting. Marineland does not rate either lighting system by tank size or watts. Instead, these units are rated in lumens. I don't think most freshwater aquarists are familiar with lumen ratings, but the 17-inch until offers 400 lumens and the 21" unit comes in at 550 lumens.

Installation

Either the 17 or 21-inch unit may be attached with suction cups or by clipping to the tank frame. Marineland provides a clever attachment system that works well. I used the clips to attach to an internal rail I installed in my tank. It's easy to pull the unit out for cleaning.

An external switch is provided and the small power supply is plugged into it. Here are a couple of illustrations so you get the idea:

Marineland Hidden LED Lighting System Diagram 

Installation Options

How well does it work?

The lunar light mode provides a nice blue accent to the tank. This is a great mode to use first thing in the morning when you are trying to wake up your fish.

With all LEDs on, however, lighting for my 50 gallon tank was inadequate. Marineland bills this item as a "complete, submersible lighting system" and given the price, I was expecting higher light output. The light output might be OK for a smaller tank, for example a 15-20 gallon tank. 

The light has a shimmering effect because the blue LEDs are always on. It's kind of cool, but it makes it a bit hard to see the fish. 

Recommendations

I can't give a glowing (no pun intended) recommendation for this product because the light output is so low. I own several other Marineland LED systems, such as the Single Brite units and they seem markedly brighter to me. It could be that the Single Brite systems include a tiny reflector behind each LED which amplifies light. The 18" Single Brite is rated at 300 lumens compared to the 400 lumen 17" Hidden LED system and it appears twice as bright to me. 

I use an 18" Single Brite on a 40G tank of about the same size and the illumination is great.

Final Thoughts

I wish Marineland had forgone the blue LEDs and included more white leds with a better reflector. This product really is a great idea, but it falls short in execution.

Fortunately, I don't grow plants and the fish don't seem to mind the light. I was happy I was able to find a product to replace my end caps and lower my energy costs, but I compromised on having a nicely lit tank.

In my article, A Visit to Tank and his Amazing Fish Bins, I talked about a great deal I got on a large, 55-gallon plastic bins for growing out fish.

Here, I'll discuss how to double-plumb one of these bins to make water changes easy and to prevent accidental overfills. You can use this technique with just about any large container.

Here's what you'll need:

- Two one-inch bulkhead fittings
- One-inch PVC ball valve
- PVC Elbows
- Two PVC Barbed Connectors (for hose)
- One PVC barbed T Connector
- One inch ID flexible thin wall clear tubing

The actual parts you use may vary, but the basic principle is to drill two holes in the bin. One hole is the drain and other is the high-water level overflow. The high-water overflow bypasses the drain valve.

To drain the bin, you turn the valve at the bottom. To refill, turn the valve to off. The high-water level drain prevents flooding or may be used in a trickle system. The drain line runs to floor drain or sump pit for your home.

Last month, I had the opportunity to visit with Ted Judy at his fishroom near Madison, WI. Ted is an expert in West African cichlids and he has visited Africa to collect these interesting fish twice. Need I mention that he is a frequent speaker to aquarium clubs and a very knowledgeable hobbyist, too?

I met Ted at his beautiful home and got to see his amazing and spotless aquariums. Ted had an awesome planted tank in his living room. These always impress me as I'm pretty awful keeping plants alive. This tank was a carpet of green! Almost all of his aquariums have plants in them.

Ted is active in aquarium clubs in Milwaukee and he started one in Madison which is doing great. We got to chat about running clubs and he is very knowledgeable.

Ted keeps a variety of fish including, of course, lots of West African cichlids, but he also had a very nice selection of livebearers, too. It is always great to visit someone's fishroom because I always learn something new! For example, I found out that water hardness affects the sex ratio of some livebearers. Interesting!

Ted sells fish at very reasonable prices. I came home with Chromidotilapia kingsleyae, Pelvicachomis taeniatus "moliwe", and Limia sp. "Tiger".

Ted recently has begun selling Repashy gel foods. I've tried a couple of them and they are terrific. Even my large, predatory cichlids will eat the veggie food. I've also tried the Community Gel and my fish love it.

Ted was nice enough to donate enough samples for everyone at the last GCCA Meeting to try the food.

You can see what Ted has for sale at www.tedsfishroom.com. You'll find a lot of other great information there, too, so it's worth the click!

I've included a few pics below.

 
Most Ted's tanks have very nice plants like these two above.

 
Ted netting out some Limia sp. "Tiger" for me.

 
GCCA Members holding up samples of Repashy gel food donated by Ted Judy.

 

Ever have a tank get cloudy?

I think everyone has experienced this at one time or another. Most recently, I had a really bad snail outbreak in a 90-gallon tank, so I removed the fish (which I was selling anyway) and bleached the tank. After 24-hours of snail-killing  bleach, I stirred the sand substrate and siphoned out as much debris as I could. Then, I refilled the tank.

This is where the "cloudy" happened. After filling the tank and re-starting the filter, the tank was cloudy with very fine sediment. Usually, the filter will remove this in 24 hours. but after a week the tank was still cloudy. What to do?

AccuClearAccu-Clear to the Rescue

I was a bit stumped at this point, but then I remembered that I had won a goodie bag at one of the GCCA Meetings in the raffle. Inside, was an 8 ounce bottle of Accu-Clear from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals. This, I thought, is worth a try.

Using the product is simple. Just dump in 1 teaspoon (5ml) per ten gallons of water. The cap offers a convenient measure built in.

Bonus! Within 24-hours my tank water was sparkling clear!

How does it work?

Accu-Clear is a flocculant. The chemicals in the product bond to particles in the water a bit like glue and aggregate them. The result is that the particles fall out of the water column to the bottom of the tank where you can ignore them (I did) or siphon them out.

Although I didn't have fish in the tank at the time, you can use this product even if your tank is stocked.

Final Thoughts

What else can I say?

This product does what it claims to do. An 8 ounce bottle will run you $7 to $10 and will treat 480 gallons of water. I think this is a good product that every aquarist ought to have on hand. 

All we recently upgraded our classifieds to provide some really nice features

  • Youtube support – have a video display directly in your classifieds ad
  • Status of ad’s waiting approval via the website, you can see ad’s in the my ad’s section prior to approval
  • Confirmation that your ad has been posted prior to approval via email
  • Confirmation once your ad is approved via email
  • Pictures can now be resized during the upload process; a number of users had challenges resizing pictures. Well the website will now handle that for you.
  • All of our emails have been updated to communicate to users to correctly categorize hybrids, almost every hybrid that was posted on the site was never posted under the hybrid section (people seem to not like to call the fish they sell hybrids)

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The latest list of GCCA Meetings, Swaps, Picnics, Auctions and Classic.
DIY, how to, helpful hints and other tips and tricks
Tips and Tricks for breeding cichlids
Great tips and tricks for fish keeping